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Thursday, April 16, 2015

Xingyi, Bagua, Taiji Seminar in Boulder, Colorado with Matt Autrey - Starts Saturday!


Matt Autrey


 

   *Senior Student of Luo De Xiu of Taiwan*
*Boulder, CO. April 18th & 19th 2015* 
Matt Autrey is a senior student of Internal Kung Fu teacher Luo De Xiu. Matt has moved back to the United States after 8 years of training Bagua Zhang, Xingyi Quan, Taiji Quan in Taipei, Taiwan including 5 years with Marcus Brinkman as a private student. Matt spent many years teaching and assisting in Teacher Luo’s class in Taiwan, his extensive knowledge and command of the principles, theory and applications of the internal martial arts is an asset to any practitioner.
   
        Boulder, CO. Dates and Curriculum: 

Saturday, April 18th - 1st Session 1:00pm – 4:00pm       
Gao Bagua Xian Tian – Snake Palm - Theory and Application
This will be an excellent introduction to the basics of Bagua and the first palm; the snake palm. Learn the fundamental training practices, footwork, and applications of Gao Bagua Snake Palm.  This seminar is open to public and beginners are welcome.

Saturday, April 18th – 2nd Session 4:30pm – 7:30pm
Xing Yi Quan – Combining the Fists – Skills and Drills
Matt will be teaching sets and drills to help the practitioner combine multiple Xingyi Quan fists. This session will cover the methodology, training drills and application strategies used in linking and combining the fists.  This seminar is open to public, beginners and advanced practitioners are welcome.
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Sunday, April 19th - 1st Session 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Gao Bagua Zhang – Hou Tian – Straight Line Bagua – Line 1 (1.1 – 1.4)
In this seminar Matt will teach line 1 Hou Tian Bagua, the famous Straight Line
Bagua of the Gao system. Matt will cover Bagua form, theory, application
and training practices for the 1st line with an emphasis on its relationship
to the Snake Palm. This seminar is a great addition to any Bagua Zhang
style. It is recommended that the Snake Palm Seminar is taken before
this class. 

Sunday, April 19th - 2nd Session 4:00pm – 7:00pm
Taiji Quan – the Four Essential Actions – Pushing Hands
Building on the basics of Taiji’s Four Essential Actions set, its form, theory and training concepts, this two person push hands class will build the correct reflexes, timing and distance required for the usage of Taiji Quan. This seminar is open to public and beginners are welcome.

Cost:

1       $180 for all Four Sessions. 

2       Individually, Each Session is $50.

3       Saturday & Sunday $100 each day or $180 for both Days.

4       Preferred payment is cash (please contact if paying by check)

5       Same day registration (call for availability) $190 cash only

FOR LOCATION - EMAIL:
Owen Schilling
at mailto:Owen_YiZong@Hotmail.com

    Or Check http://boulderinternalmartialarts.blogspot.com/

Call 1 720 841 3526 

Matt will be offering private lessons while he is in town. I highly recommend them; his knowledge and skill applied at the individual level is a fantastic catalyst for growth. Contact me or Matt at yizongwest@gmail.com or talk to him at the seminar.  

                  For more info on Matt check his Website: Portland Bagua

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Pushing Hands—Part 2 by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming

About Pushing Hands—Part 2
This is a Part 2 of "About Pushing Hands" by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming. SeePart 1 for the beginning of this excerpt.

The Secret of Àn

Àn 按 (Press or Push Down) means to settle the wrist. It is executed by using the base of the palm, either one palm or both palms can press and push. Àn can be divided into offensive Àn and defensive Àn. In offensive Àn, the base of the palm is used to push upward to the chin to destroy the opponent's central equilibrium; to the throat to seal the opponent's breath; to push forward to Xīnkǎn 心坎 (Jiūwěi, 鳩尾) (i.e., solar plexus area) to seal the breath as well as destroy the opponent's central equilibrium or shock his heart; to push downward to the abdominal area to destroy the stability of the lower part of his body or to seal his breath. Defensive Àn is used to seal off the coming Jìng 勁 from the opponent. This is commonly done by pressing-pushing down the opponent's shoulders or elbows, which will cause the opponent to lean forward and will seal off his coming Jìng.
The secret of "Àn 按" that has been passed down by oral tradition is to "settle the wrist" (Zuò Wàn, 坐腕). That means to press the base of the palm forward. Àn Jìng 按勁 can be used either offensively or defensively. When it is used for upward attack, the target can be the chin to upset the opponent's central equilibrium or the throat to seal the breath.
When it is used for forward attack, the target is the solar plexus area (Xīnkǎn 心坎) (Jiūwěi, 鳩尾). Xīnkǎn is a martial name, while Jiūwěi is a Chinese medical name. When this place is attacked, you can seal the opponent's breath or even shock his heart. Naturally, you can also use it to destroy the opponent's central equilibrium. When Àn is used for downward attack, the abdominal area is the main target. When this area is attacked correctly, the muscles can be contracted and will seal the breath.
Àn is also commonly used for defense, allowing you to seal incoming attacks such as Jìng or Àn. When it is applied for this purpose, the shoulders or elbows are pressed downward to hinder the incoming attack.

Using Cǎi 採 to Pluck

Cǎi means, to pluck and then take away. Cǎi does not mean to grab. When you grab, you tighten up and the Jìng will be dull and not alive, and can be used by the opponent. If you use Grabbing Jìng, the body must be stiff and the upper body will be tight. When the upper body is tightened, the opponent can take this opportunity (to defeat you). Cǎi means to use the thumb and index finger or middle finger to pluck and pull away. Pluck also means to press the cavities, and pull away means, to destroy the opponent's central equilibrium. Generally speaking, the places for plucking and pulling are shoulders, elbows, and wrists. When it is used for the shoulders, it is used to control the Jiānjǐng 肩井 (GB-21) or Jiānnèilíng 肩內陵 (M-UE-48) cavity. When it is used for the elbows, it is to pluck and press the Qūchí 曲池 (LI-11) and Shàohǎi 少海 (H-3) cavities and then pull downward and sideways. When it is used for the wrists, it is to pluck the Nèiguān 內關 (P-6) cavity and then pull it downward and sideways. If the situation allows, you may use both hands to pluck and press any two places. When you use Cǎi, you must pluck and lead the opponent until he loses his central equilibrium. If you stop midway, the opponent can easily use his Zhǒu 肘 (Elbow) or Kào 靠 (Bump) to counterattack you. Those students must be very careful about this. Additionally, the pluck must be fast. If slow, it can also be used by the opponent.
When you use Cǎi Jìng, you should not grab. If you grab, the arm will be tensed and the body will be stiff. This will provide a good opportunity for your opponent to find your center. When you pluck, normally you use your thumb and index or middle finger. It is common that when you pluck, you press the cavities as well. When cavities are pressed, it can cause numbness and this will prevent the opponent from getting away. Common cavities for this on the shoulder are Jiānjǐng and Jiānnèilíng, on the elbow are Qūchí and Shàohǎi, and on the wrist is Nèiguān.
When you apply Cǎi Jìng in combat, once you have plucked the opponent and begin pulling to destroy his central equilibrium, you must continue your pulling until he has lost balance, otherwise he can use his elbow or shoulder to bump you. In addition, pluck is used in a fast action. If you are slow and your opponent senses your intention, he can easily create an advantageous opportunity for his attack.

Using Liè, Zhǒu, and Péng Jìng , 肘,掤勁

Liè means to split both arms in opposite directions and use the front arm to attack diagonally. The two arms are opposite divided and become mutual Yīn (陰) and Yáng (陽). When there is a Yīn and Yáng balance, the central equilibrium can be maintained during attacking. Tàijíquán postures such as Grasp the Sparrow's Tail, Diagonal Flying, and Wild Horse Parts Its Mane contain patterns of Liè Jìng (Splitting Jìng). When you execute Liè Jìng, you must first know Péng Jìng. Without knowing Péng Jìng, the Liè Jìng will be ineffective. Additionally, the central equilibrium can be lost easily. Liè Jìng is often used against the opponent's Zhǒu and Kào Jìngs (i.e. Elbow and Bump Jìngs). When applying Liè Jìng, you must first pluck the opponent's wrist or elbow. If you don't know how to pluck the opponent and apply your Liè Jìng, then your opponent can easily use this opportunity and attack you with his elbow.
Liè means to split. In order to generate a split action, you will need two forces executed in opposite directions. One is used to attack the opponent while the other is used to balance the attacking force. In this case, you can maintain your balance and center. When you use Liè Jìng, you must have Péng Jìng within. Without Péng Jìng, the spine and chest bows will not be able to store the Jìng in the posture. In addition, with Péng Jìng, you can protect your center easily. In order to make Liè Jìng effective and place yourself in a secure position, you must first pluck your opponent's elbow or wrist. If you do not do this, your opponent can easily use his elbow to attack you.
Zhǒu means to use the elbow to neutralize, to attack, or to coil. The neutralization of Zhǒu prevents your elbows from being plucked or squeezed by the opponent. If your elbows are plucked, controlled, sealed, or squeezed, then you must use the Zhǒu Jìng with the coordination of Péng Jìng to neutralize it. The attack of the elbow must be executed in short range fighting (i.e. small circle). To execute Zhǒu Jìng, you must have entered the central door or have occupied the opponent's empty door, so Zhǒu Jìng can be used. If you have already plucked the opponent's wrist, you can use your elbow to press his elbow upward to control his arm. When you execute your Zhǒu Jìng, you must be very cautious to guard yourself against the opponent's Lǚ Jìng (i.e., Rollback Jìng). If your opponent is good at using Lǚ Jìng, he can pull your root and destroy your central equilibrium. Therefore, you must be very careful to prevent this from happening.
The skill of Zhǒu Jìng can be used for neutralization, stroke, or even to coil the opponent's arm for control. When it is used for neutralization, it is commonly used to prevent your opponent from plucking, controlling, sealing, or squeezing your elbows. Through circling your elbows with Péng Jìng, you will be able to re-direct the opponent's force and neutralize it. This will prevent him from locating your center and destroying it. When you and your opponent are in a short range-fighting situation, if the opportunity allows, you should use your elbow to strike the opponent's vital areas. When you execute your strikes, you must have already taken an advantageous position, such as occupying the central door or entering his empty door. If you have not placed him into this urgent position, he can easily counter you by controlling your shoulder or elbow and destroying your balance. The elbow can also be used in Qín Ná techniques. For example, if you have grabbed your opponent's wrist with one hand, you can use the elbow of the other arm to coil his elbow and lock him up. When you apply Elbow (Zhǒu, 肘), you must be alert to prevent your opponent from using Lǚ Jìng (i.e., Rollback Jìng) to counter.
Kào means to use part of your own body to bump the opponent's body to make him lose his central equilibrium. Kào Jìng can be divided into shoulder Kào, chest Kào, back Kào, hip Kào, and knee Kào, etc. Kào Jìng is the same as Zhǒu Jìng, which must be applied when the opponent is near. Therefore, the skills of how to occupy the central door and enter the empty door must be expert and alive; you can then create an advantageous opportunity and establish a desirable position. As with Zhǒu Jìng, when you apply Kào Jìng, you must be cautious to guard yourself against the opponent's Lǚ Jìng. If the opponent is good at using Lǚ Jìng, he can pull your root and destroy your central equilibrium. Therefore, you must be careful to prevent this from happening.
Kào and Zhǒu Jìngs specialize in short range-fighting situations. To apply Kào, you may use any part of your body to bump your opponent out of balance. For example, you may use your shoulders, chest, back, hips, knees, etc. to bump your opponent off. Since Kào is a short range fighting technique, you must already have an advantageous position when you use it to avoid your opponent's attack. Only when your opponent is in an urgent situation can you get closer to his body without taking too much of a risk. If you are interested in knowing more about these Tàijíquán eight basic Jìng patterns, please refer to the books: Taiji Chin Na or Taijiquan-Classical Yang Style by YMAA.

Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming, is a renowned author and teacher of Chinese martial arts and Qigong. Born in Taiwan, he has trained and taught Taijiquan, Qigong and Chinese martial arts for over forty-five years. He is the author of over thirty books, and was elected by Inside Kung Fu magazine as one of the 10 people who has "made the greatest impact on martial arts in the past 100 years." Dr. Yang lives in Northern California.

Found:HERE

Monday, April 13, 2015

Pushing Hands—Part 1 by Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming

About Pushing Hands—Part 1
Practicing Methods of the Four Directions and Four Corners - Sì Fāng Sì Yú Liàn Fǎ 四方四隅練法 (Eight Doors, Eight Trigrams) 【Bā Mén, Bā Guà 八門 ` 八卦】
What are the four directions and four corners? They are the eight doors. It is also the theory of Eight Trigrams in Tàijíquán 太極拳. What are the four directions? They arePéng 掤 (i.e., Wardoff),  (i.e., Rollback),  擠 (i.e., Squeeze or Press), and Àn 按 (i.e., Push or Press Down). What are the four corners? They are Cǎi 採 (i.e., Pluck), Liè  (i.e., Split), Zhǒu 肘 (i.e., Elbow), and Kào 靠 (i.e., Bump). The four directions are the four main supporting posts (in a building), the major generals (in a battle), and are the major Jìng 勁 patterns of Tàijíquán. The four corners are the four assistant posts and are the four assistant Jìng patterns in Tàijíquán and are the deputy generals.
Tàijíquán is also called "Thirteen Postures" or "Thirteen Patterns" (Shí Sān Shì, 十三勢), which includes "Eight Jìng Patterns," commonly called "Eight Doors" (Bā Mén, 八門) and "Five Strategic Steppings" (Wǔ Bù, 五步). According to the Tàijíquán Classic, the actions of the eight Jìng patterns correspond to the eight trigrams (Bāguà, 八卦) while the five steppings correspond to the "Five Elements" (Wǔ Xíng, 五行). The eight trigrams are: Qián 乾 (Heaven), Kūn 坤 (Earth),Kǎn 坎 (Water),  離 (Fire), which correspond to the four main sides, and Xùn 巽 (Wind), Zhèn 震 (Thunder), Duì 兌 (Lake), and Gěn 艮 (Mountain), which correspond to the four diagonal corners. The five elements are: metal (Jīn, 金), wood (, 木), water (Shuǐ, 水), fire (Huǒ, 火), and earth (, 土).
Péng , Lǚ, Jǐ, and Àn are the four major Jìng patterns that have become the four major crucial foundations of the Tàijíquán art. Cǎi, Liè, Zhǒu, and Kào are the four assistant Jìng patterns that make the art more complete. With the five strategic steppings, the art of Tàijíquán becomes a complete fighting art.
Péng is constructed from the two arms shaped as two crescent moons and is called "drawing in the chest and arcing the back" which can be used as yielding to neutralize incoming Jìng. Arcing stores the Jìng in the body's two bows. These two bows are the chest bow and the spine bow. These two places are the most important places to store Jìng in the body. If you know Péng, then you will better know how to store Jìng. If you know how to store, then you will know how to emit. Péng Jìng exists everywhere in Tàijíquán. Not only Lǚ, Jǐ, and Àn have Péng included within them, but it is also included in Cǎi, Liè, Zhǒu, and Kào.
The word Péng was created in Tàijíquán society and does not exist in regular dictionaries. This word is constructed from three characters, which signify a hand and two moons. The moon is single and therefore implies loneliness in Chinese culture. When two moons are put together, it means “friend” in the Chinese language. Since the two moons are friends, they mutually support, help, and harmonize with each other. With regards to Pushing Hands, Péng implies arcing both arms like two crescent moons and coordinating them with each other. In Tàijíquán, in order to make the arcing harmonious, the chest is drawn in while the back is rounded backward. This is an important oral secret for storing Jìng and is called "Hán Xiōng Bá Bèi 含胸拔背" which means, "draw in the chest and arc the back." When this happens, the body can be used to yield and neutralize any incoming force, and can simultaneously be used to store Jìng in the body's two bows for emitting later on.
The body includes six bows. The two arms and two legs are four bows that allow you to store Jìng in the posture and then release it. The torso has two bows—the chest bow (Xiōng Gōng, 胸弓) and the spine bow (Jǐ Gōng, 脊弓). The force-exerting point for the chest bow is the lower part of the sternum (Jiūwěi, 鳩尾) (Co-15) while the exerting point for the spine is Mìngmén 命門 (Gv-4). From these two points the body can be shaped as a bow and Jìng can be stored for emitting.

Péng Jìng is the Essence of Tàijíquán

Péng Jìng is the first and the most important Jìng pattern in Tàijíquán. In fact, it can be said that unless you know the essence of Péng Jìng, you really don't know Tàijíquán. In order to make the storage of all other Jìngs effective, Péng Jìng can be found in almost every Tàijíquán posture.
To train Péng Jìng, you allow your training partner to control your elbows and use any possible technique to push you. His intention is to destroy your central equilibrium. You use Péng Jìng, which is initiated from your legs and controlled by your waist. Then you draw in the chest and arc your back to manifest it in your arms. Turn your waist to neutralize, to arc outward, and to yield. Repeat the practice until the action has become natural. After you have practiced for a long time, you will be able to use Péng Jìng everywhere.
There are many ways of training Péng Jìng in all Tàijíquán styles. However, one of the most effective ways for a beginner to build up a firm foundation and sound habits is through elbow controlling practice. In this practice, allow your opponent to use both of his hands to control (i.e.Ná Jìng, 拿勁) your elbows. Since the elbow is very close to the center of your body, it is easy for your opponent to find your center and push you off balance. In order to neutralize, you must turn and also draw in your chest, and round your back with the two arms arced outward. When this is done, your opponent will have a harder time to locate your center. Naturally, it is not easy at the beginning. However, after practicing for a long time, it will become easier and more natural. You also will have familiarized yourself with the body's structure, rooting, and waist control. This will allow you to be softer and softer in your actions and finally you can reach the target of using "four ounces to repel one thousand pounds" (Sì Liǎng Pò Qiān Jīn, 四啢破千斤).
Lǚ involves using the hands to rollback and neutralize (the coming force). That means using Péng Jìng as the major Jìng to yield, lead, and neutralize the coming force to the left or to the right. Lǚ Jìng can be classified as Small Rollback (Xiǎo Lǚ, 小) and Large Rollback (Dà Lǚ, 大). In small rollback, the circle of coiling and neutralizing Jìng is smaller. In large rollback, the action is larger, the stepping is bigger, and the circle of coiling and neutralizing is also on a larger scale. When practicing, Lǚ Jìng is used together with Jǐ Jìng (i.e., Press or Squeeze Jìng) and Kào Jìng (i.e., Bump Jìng). After Lǚ, immediately follow with Jǐ or Kào. After Jǐ or Kào, immediately Lǚ. Repeat as such.
Lǚ Jìng includes Yielding Jìng (Ràng Jìng, 讓勁), Leading Jìng (Yǐn Jìng, 引勁), and Neutralizing Jìng (Huà Jìng, 化勁). For effective execution, these three Jìngs all include Wardoff Jìng (Péng Jìng). The ancient oral key implies Lǚ is "leading the Jìng into emptiness" (Yǐn Jìng Luò Kōng, 引勁落空). In order to do this, you must lead the Jìng to your side, so you can neutralize it by leading the incoming force into emptiness.
In practice, there are two skills of Rollback; they can be classified as "Small Rollback" (Xiǎo Lǚ) and "Large Rollback" (Dà Lǚ). In the execution of Small Rollback, the action of coiling, leading, and neutralizing is smaller and the techniques are different from those of Large Rollback. Theoretically and practically speaking, to be effective in action, Rollback is always used together either with Press Jìng (Jǐ Jìng) or Bump Jìng (Kào Jìng).
Jǐ (Press) is used for small range offense and defense. It can be done by overlapping both hands and then pressing forward. It can be done by using one hand to press the other hand's wrist and then press forward. It can also be done by using one hand to press the other forearm and then press forward. All the above Jǐs are used for offense and are used to press the opponent's upper body to destroy his central equilibrium. In addition, Jǐ can also be done by squeezing two hands or two arms toward each other. This kind of Jǐ is mostly used to squeeze the opponent's elbows to close off and hinder his Jǐ Jìng (Press Jìng), Àn Jìng (Push Jìng), or to seal off his arms' function. Squeezing can also be used to press the opponent's chest (i.e. solar plexus) to make the opponent's Qì float.
Jǐ is a Jìng pattern that is designed to be used in short range fighting. Jǐ can be done in different ways, such as with both hands overlapping each other and then pressing forward, one hand pressing the other wrist and then pressing forward or one hand pressing the other forearm and then pressing forward. When the Jǐ Jìng is applied as such, usually it is used for offense and aims to destroy the opponent's central equilibrium. This kind of Jǐ can also be used to press-strike the solar plexus to inflict pain or injury on the opponent's stomach and make his Qì float.

Jǐ can also be done by squeezing both hands or arms toward each other. This Jǐ can effectively be used for defense and against an opponent's Jǐ or Àn. The hands are used to squeeze the opponent's elbows to hinder his intention. Occasionally, this kind of Jǐ can be used to upset the solar plexus area as well.


Found:HERE

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Uses of the Thirteen Postures by Wu Yuxiang



"(It is) also said, first in the xin, then in the body, the belly relaxed, qi collects to enter the bones, spirit calm body tranquil, every moment this is the heart." Translation: Scott M. Rodell

From the “Insight into the Uses of the Thirteen Posture,” by Wu Yuxiang
found - HERE 

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Xingyi, Bagua, Taiji Seminar in Boulder, Colorado with Matt Autrey - 2 Weeks!


Matt Autrey


 
   *Senior Student of Luo De Xiu of Taiwan*
*Boulder, CO. April 18th & 19th 2015* 
Matt Autrey is a senior student of Internal Kung Fu teacher Luo De Xiu. Matt has moved back to the United States after 8 years of training Bagua Zhang, Xingyi Quan, Taiji Quan in Taipei, Taiwan including 5 years with Marcus Brinkman as a private student. Matt spent many years teaching and assisting in Teacher Luo’s class in Taiwan, his extensive knowledge and command of the principles, theory and applications of the internal martial arts is an asset to any practitioner.
   
        Boulder, CO. Dates and Curriculum: 

Saturday, April 18th - 1st Session 1:00pm – 4:00pm       
Gao Bagua Xian Tian – Snake Palm - Theory and Application
This will be an excellent introduction to the basics of Bagua and the first palm; the snake palm. Learn the fundamental training practices, footwork, and applications of Gao Bagua Snake Palm.  This seminar is open to public and beginners are welcome.

Saturday, April 18th – 2nd Session 4:30pm – 7:30pm
Xing Yi Quan – Combining the Fists – Skills and Drills
Matt will be teaching sets and drills to help the practitioner combine multiple Xingyi Quan fists. This session will cover the methodology, training drills and application strategies used in linking and combining the fists.  This seminar is open to public, beginners and advanced practitioners are welcome.
&nbsp
Sunday, April 19th - 1st Session 1:00pm – 4:00pm
Gao Bagua Zhang – Hou Tian – Straight Line Bagua – Line 1 (1.1 – 1.4)
In this seminar Matt will teach line 1 Hou Tian Bagua, the famous Straight Line
Bagua of the Gao system. Matt will cover Bagua form, theory, application
and training practices for the 1st line with an emphasis on its relationship
to the Snake Palm. This seminar is a great addition to any Bagua Zhang
style. It is recommended that the Snake Palm Seminar is taken before
this class. 

Sunday, April 19th - 2nd Session 4:00pm – 7:00pm
Taiji Quan – the Four Essential Actions – Pushing Hands
Building on the basics of Taiji’s Four Essential Actions set, its form, theory and training concepts, this two person push hands class will build the correct reflexes, timing and distance required for the usage of Taiji Quan. This seminar is open to public and beginners are welcome.

Cost:

1       $180 for all Four Sessions. 

2       Individually, Each Session is $50.

3       Saturday & Sunday $100 each day or $180 for both Days.

4       Preferred payment is cash (please contact if paying by check)

5       Same day registration (call for availability) $190 cash only

FOR LOCATION - EMAIL:
Owen Schilling
at mailto:Owen_YiZong@Hotmail.com

    Or Check http://boulderinternalmartialarts.blogspot.com/

Call 1 720 841 3526 

Matt will be offering private lessons while he is in town. I highly recommend them; his knowledge and skill applied at the individual level is a fantastic catalyst for growth. Contact me or Matt at yizongwest@gmail.com or talk to him at the seminar.  

                  For more info on Matt check his Website: Portland Bagua